Confused About Wireless Speeds – Standards Archive

Confused about wireless speeds, on your wireless home computer let me explain. All of the important standards are know by Wi-Fi the standards are themselves maintained by a association called Wireless Ethernet Compatibility Alliance (WECA) interoperability among the various products is a good thing.

One of the first standard to hit the market and still the most popular is called 802.11b with a rated speed of 11 Mbps – mega bits per second A standard for 802.11a, it is rated at 54Mbps – 25 Mbps – when .11b is not present and yes, “b” came before “a”

The newest product on the block with an increase in wireless speed 802.11g which is rated at 54Mbp unless you install a 802.11b card (11Mbps) , then the speed drops to the slowest device 802.11b, but they are compatible with 802.11b network interface (NIC) cards.

They should also have no problems or issues with using standard protocols such as TCP/IP which has a reliable connection and delivery protocol.  You can use them on servers and multihomed devices such as rotating proxies

Because of backward compatibility, older and slower 802.11b radio cards can interface directly with an 802.11g access point and vice versa at 11Mbps or lower wireless speeds , depending upon the range.

Quick Tip: The wireless speed gold standard is*802.11g – – the newest, fastest and most powerful kid on the block 802.11 radio technology that broadens bandwidths to 54 Mbps within the 2.4 GHz band.

In other words the two standards work together fine. But if I where installing a new wireless network or adding new wireless pc’s I would use the *802.11g for all of my computers.

We all like speed and no matter how fast we can go, on line or off , we still want to do it faster. When I moved my ISP account from the basic dial up modem (56Kbs) and replaced it with Cable I was one happy computer guy.  Let’s be honest those days are long gone and little basic modems wouldn’t keep up with even a very basic static web site now.

Most people now expect to be able to stream directly irrespective of which device they’re on.  How many of us have sat in a cafe or on a bus streaming HD quality video to the small phone in our hand, this takes a serious amount of bandwidth even if you have access to a 4G network.  I know for a fact that many people on my early morning train sit and watch the BBC on a VPN (we’re outside UK) using the wireless access point provided on the train.

Quick Tip: Troubleshooting cabling performance If you’re experiencing connection problems- check the following

So as far as wireless speed and wired networks are concerned…

    • Look for sources of interference, such as power outlets, fluorescent lights, power supplies, and coiled or extra-long cables.
    • Make sure all cable connections are secure. Check the link light on the network card – Nic – the devices you are connecting with each cable.
    • Make sure you have used the correct type of cables, either straight-through or crossover. Check hardware setup instructions to verify which cable you might need.
    • Be sure that you have not used a telephone cable in an Ethernet cable port.

The speed chain of command goes like this…

  • Fiber optic cable Uses light 186,000 MilesPsec, that’s fast The speed of light depends on the material that the light moves through – for example: light moves slower in water – glass and through the atmosphere than in a vacuum
  • Coaxial cable uses shielding to keep the signal focused and RG-6 & Cat. 5E 350MHz Dual Cableuses shielding to keep the signal focusedl reduces interference
  • Twisted pair Most commonly used in wired networks – UTP Cat 5e twists the pairs around each other to reduce interference and reinforce the signal

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