TCP Configuration: Timestamp Option

The function of the timestamp option is fairly self explanatory, it simply lets the sender place a timestamp value in each and every segment.   In turn the receiver will also reflect this value in it’s acknowledgement which allows the sender to calculate a round trip time for every received ACK.    Remember this is indeed per ACK and not segment as this can include multiple segments.

Initially most implementations of TCP would only allow one RTT per window however this has changed and nowadays larger windows sizes need more accurate RTT calculations.   You can read about the definitions of these calculations in RFC 1323 which covers the TCP enhanced extensions that allow these improved RTT calculations. The time is estimated by sampling a data signal at a lower frequency one time per window which works well with smaller windows (and less segments).

Accurate measurement of data transmission is often very difficult in congested and busy networks also when troubleshooting across networks like the internet.  It’s difficult to  isolate issues and solve problems in these sort of environments because you have no control or access to the majority of the transport hardware.  For example if you are tryign to fix a Netflix VPN problem remotely being able to check the RTT is essential to analyse where the problems potentially lie.

The sender will place a 32 bit value in the initial field which will be echoed back by the receiver in the reply field. This will increase the size of the TCP header from 20 bytes to 32 bytes when this option is used. The timestamp value will increase value on each transaction. There is no clock synchronization between the sender and the receiver merely an increase in the value of the timestamp unit. Most implementations of the timestamp option recommend that the value increment in units of one ideally between 1 millisecond and 1 second.

This option is configured during the connection establishment and is handled the same way as the windows scale option in the previous section. As you may know the receiving connection does not have to acknowledge every data segment it receives. This however is simplified because only a single timestamp value is maintained per active connection which is updated according to simple algorithm.

First of all TCP monitors the timestamp value ensuring it has the correct value to send in the next ACK. The sequence number is updated after each ACK value is sent and not as it’s acknowledged. After a new segment arrives then the byte numbered in a variable called lastack is incremented. After a new segment arrives then this value is increased but the old value stored in a variable called tsrecent, When a timestamp option is sent the tsrecent value is sent, and the sequence number field is stored in the variable called lastack.

This means that in addition to the timestamp option allowing for better RTT calculation it also performs another function. The receiver can use the function to avoid receiving old duplicate segments using an addition feature called PAWS – Protection against Wrapped Sequence Numbers.

Further Reading on Commercial Proxy Options – http://www.anonymous-proxies.org/2017/05/buy-uk-proxy-ip-address.html

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